RnB soul 60s

 

JOURNEY THROUGH 400 RnB SOUL SONGS

RnB SOUL  ∙  50s  ∙  60s  ∙  70s  ∙  80s-90s  ∙  Neo Soul 2000s-2010s  ∙

RnB Soul 60s

RnB Soul 60s James Brown, Aretha Franklin, Diana Ross

RnB Soul 60s: James Brown  ∙  Aretha Franklin ∙  Diana Ross  ∙

RnB Soul 60s

In 1960, due to the distinctve trendsetting impact of its vocal stars who put their soul into their voice, RnB's high-profile scene began to be called 'RnB Soul'.

  • Girl bands had enjoyed popular success earlier - such as with the songs 'Lollipop' (1958, The Chordettes) and  'I met him on a Sunday' (1958, The Shirelles) - and also flourished in the RnB Soul scene in the 60s. The Supremes with Diana Ross became the most famous of them with their planetary hit 'Baby love' (1964).
  • RnB rock saw the arrival of Ben E. King, The Valentinos with Bobby Womack, Wilson Picket, Ike & Tina Turner and, in the progressive rock movement, Jimi Hendrix.
  • RnB blues-jazz was marked by the beginnings of Aretha Franklin (1942-2018), a singer and musician from gospel who shone as much in soul vocals pop as in rock and blues-jazz registers. Nina Simone was the other great lady of the 60s’ RnB blues-jazz, where veteran Louis 'Satchmo' Armstrong (1901-1971) released 'What a wonderful world' (1967), his biggest commercial success. Meanwhile, "Little" Stevie Wonder was blind and 13 when his single "Fingertips part II" (1963) topped the Billboard and 17 when his psychedelic soul track "I was made to love her" (1967) topped the RnB charts.
  • On the RnB Soul vocals scene, the king of soul Sam Cooke (1931-1964) suffered a violent death at the age of 33. The new king of soul was Otis Redding (1941-1967) but he too died prematurely at the height of his fame, and it was posthumously that his signature song '(Sitting on) The dock of the Bay' was published in January 1968. Marvin Gaye, Aaron Neville and Dionne Warwick also appeared during the decade, as did RnB vocals groups The Temptations, The Four Tops and The Jackson Five.
  • Psychedelic soul took hold in 1967 - the same year as psychedelic rock, cf. Rock USA 60s - and blew a new wind. Incumbent vocals groups such as The Temptations and Diana Ross & the Supremes successfully joined the genre, where Fifth Dimension and Sly & the Family Stone took center stage. Also worth mentionning: Marlena Shaw's 'California soul', Donny Hathaway's 'The Ghetto pt. 2' and funk pioneers The Meters' Cissy strut'.

SOUL GIRL GROUPS  ∙  1958  ∙  I met him on a Sunday (The Shirelles)  ∙  1960  ∙  Will you love me tomorrow (The Shirelles)  ∙  1961  ∙  Please Mr. Postman (The Marvelettes)  ∙  1963  ∙  Be my baby (The Ronettes)  ∙  1964  ∙  Walking in the rain (The Ronettes)  ∙  Baby love (The Supremes ft Diana Ross)  ∙  Dancing in the streets (Martha & the Vandellas)  ∙  Needle in a haystack (The Velvelettes)  ∙  (Like a) Nightmare (The Andantes)  ∙  1965  ∙  I'm blue (The Ikettes)  ∙  Rescue me ( Fontella Bass)  ∙  He's an oddball (The Lewis Sisters)  ∙  1967  ∙  I heard it through the grapevine (Gladys Knight & the Pips)  ∙  1969  ∙  Cheating is telling on you (The Lollipops) 

RnB ROCK  ∙  1960  ∙  Think! (James Brown & the Famous Flames)  ∙  Won't be long (Aretha Franklin)  ∙  1961  ∙  Hit the road Jack (Ray Charles)  ∙  Think it's gonna work out fine (Ike & Tina Turner)  ∙  Stand by me (Ben E. King)  ∙  1962  ∙  Don't play that song (Ben E. King, ver.  80s)  ∙  You'll lose a good thing (Barbara Lynn)  ∙  Looking for a love (The Valentinos ft Bobby Womack)  ∙  1964  ∙  It's all over now (The Valentinos)  ∙  Out of sight (James Brown & The Famous Flames)  ∙  1965  ∙  In the midnight hour (Wilson Pickett)  ∙  1966  ∙  Barefootin' (Robert Parker)  ∙  1967  ∙  Purple haze  (Jimi Hendrix)  ∙

RnB BLUES-JAZZ  ∙  1959  ∙  My baby just cares for me (Nina Simone)  ∙  1960  ∙  Georgia on my mind (Ray Charles)  ∙  Who woudln't love a man like that (Mable John)  ∙  1961  ∙  Rock-a-bye your baby with a Dixie melody (Aretha Franklin)  ∙  I pity the fool (Bobby "Blue" Bland)  ∙  Last night (The Mar Keys)  ∙  1962    Don't Lie To Me  (I get evil) (Albert King)  ∙  Another night to cry (Lonnie Johnson)  ∙  Green onions (Booker T & the MG's)  ∙  1963  ∙  Fingertips part II (Stevie Wonder)  ∙  1964  ∙  Mississippi Goddam (Nina Simone)  ∙  Devil in a blue dress on (Shorty Long)  ∙  1965  ∙  Baby scratch my back (Slim Harpo)  ∙  Big city (Shirley Horn)  ∙  1966  ∙  Wade in the water (Ramsey Lewis)  ∙  1967  ∙  What a wonderful world (Louis Armstrong)  ∙  1968  ∙  Ain't got no life (Nina Simone)  ∙  A time and a place (Junior Mance)  ∙ 

SOUL SINGERS  ∙  1960  ∙  Chain gang (Sam Cooke)  ∙  Wonderful world (don't know much) (Sam Cooke)  ∙  Gee Whiz (Carla Thomas)  ∙  He don't love you like I love you (he will break your heart) (Jerry 'Iceman' Butler)  ∙  1961  ∙  Jamie (Eddie Holland)  ∙  1962  ∙  Cry to me (Solomon Burke)  ∙  These arms of mine (Otis Redding)  ∙  1963  ∙  Don't make me over (Dionne Warwick)  ∙  1964  ∙  Good news (Sam Cooke)  ∙  Mercy, mercy (Don Convay)  ∙  My guy (Mary Wells)  ∙  The shoop shoop song (Betty Everett)  ∙  1965  ∙  You're gonna make me cry (O.V. Wright)  ∙  If you love me (really love me) (Esther Phillips)  ∙  Ain't that peculiar? / I'll be doggone (Marvin Gaye)  ∙

∙  1966  ∙  Tell it like it is (ver 1988) (Aaron Neville)  ∙  Sunny (Bobby Hebb)  ∙  Knock on wood (Eddie Floyd)  ∙  Love is a hurtin' thing (Lou Rawls)  ∙  It's a man's man's man's world (James Brown)  ∙  What becomes the brokenhearted (Jimmmy Ruffin, ver. mid-70s)  ∙  1967  ∙  Do right woman, do right man  (Aretha Franklin)  ∙  Piece of my heart ( Erma Franklin, ver. 1992)  ∙  When love slips away (Dee Dee Warwick)  ∙  Ain't no mountain high enough ( Tammi Terrell & Marvin Gaye)  ∙  Whisper you love me boy (Chris Clark)  ∙  Come on sock it to me (Syl Johnson)  ∙  Groovin' (Willie Mitchell)  ∙  1968  ∙  Sitting on the dock of the Bay (Otis Redding)  ∙  Fly me to the moon (Bobby Womack)  ∙  I'm gonna make you love me (Madeline Bell)  ∙  1969  ∙  The chokin' kind (Joe Simon)  ∙  Am I the same girl? (Barbara Acklin)   

SOUL MALE VOCAL GROUPS  ∙  1960  ∙  Shop around (Smokey Robinson & The Miracles)  ∙  1961    That's what girls are made for (The Spinners)  1962  ∙  Papa oom mow mow (The Rivingtons)  ∙  1964  ∙  Keep on pushing (The Impressions)  ∙  1965  ∙  My girl (The Temptations)  ∙  1966  ∙  Reach out (I'll be there) (The Four Tops)  ∙  Hold on I'm comin' (Sam & Dave)  ∙  1967  ∙  Soul man (Sam & Dave)  ∙  1969  ∙  What does it itake (to win your love) (Jr. Walker & the All Stars)  ∙  The tracks of my tears (Smokey Robinson & The Miracles)  ∙  Baby, I'm for real (The Originals)  ∙  I want you back (The Jackson Five)  ∙

PROGRESSIVE / PSYCHEDELIC SOUL  ∙  1966  ∙  Time has come today (The Chambers Brothers, ver. 1969)  ∙  1967  ∙  I was made to love her (Stevie Wonder)  ∙  Reflections (Diana Ross & the Supremes)  ∙  1968  ∙  Love child (Diana Ross & the Supremes)  ∙  Cloud nine (The Temptations)  ∙  Here comes the judge (Shorty Long)  ∙  Dance to the music (Sly & the Family Stone)  ∙  Stoned soul picnic (Fifth Dimension)  ∙  1969  ∙  Aquarius/Let the sunshine in (Fifth Dimension)  ∙  California soul (Marlena Shaw)  ∙  The Ghetto, Pt 2 (Donny Hathaway)  ∙  Cissy strut (The Meters)  ∙  I want to take you higher (Sly & the Family Stone) ∙  War (Edwin Starr)  ∙

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About the Motown 'hit-factory' 

Tamla/Motown Records was founded in Detroit in 1958 by Berry Gordy. In the 60s, the company operated a fully integrated business system that delivered lyrics, musical compositions, studio musicians and producers as well as marketing services. By 1965, Motown employed over 400 people. Notable artists under contract have included Smokey Robinson & the Miracles, Marvin Gaye, Stevie Wonder, the Marvelettes, Mary Wells, the Supremes, Diana Ross, the Four Tops, the Jackson Five and many more after the 60s. Motown is owned by the Universal Music Group (UMG) since 1999.

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RnB Soul 60s

JOURNEY THROUGH 400 RnB SOUL SONGS

RnB SOUL  ∙  50s  ∙  60s  ∙  70s  ∙  80s-90s  ∙  Neo Soul 2000s-2010s  ∙